Northern Pike Spawning

A number of walleye and northern pike fisheries across the state lack the ability to sustain themselves through natural reproduction. They either lack suitable spawning habitat or have salinity levels that are too high for eggs to successfully hatch. To maintain populations in these important fisheries eggs are collected each spring to be raised in the Garrison Dam and Valley City National Fish Hatcheries then used to restock walleye and northern pike fisheries.

Fishing Reports - South Central and Missouri River System

Each spring Department fisheries biologists sit down with our webcast host Mike Anderson to discuss the coming open-water fishing season. Today biologists from the South Central Fisheries District and Lake Sakakawea tell us how the fishing prospects in their areas are shaping up. Next week we’ll hear from biologists in the North Central and Southwest Fisheries Districts.

Boat Ramps and Fish Cleaning Stations Update

As spring begins to take hold and ice melts our fisheries development staff will start delivering and installing the courtesy docks and fishing piers they've been building over the winter. This year they are planning on also creating 3-4 new boat ramps and on upgrading some of the fish cleaning stations found across the state. Find out more in this week's webcast with fisheries development supervisor Bob Frohlich.

Pollinators

Did you know that about 85% of all flowering plants rely on insect or mammal pollinators to reproduce? But pollinators across the country are struggling. About 30 percent of bee colonies have been lost in the United States every year since 2006. Monarch numbers are also in severe decline. About 80 or 90 percent of the monarch population has been lost within the past two decades. There are simple steps that all of us can take to help. Learn more in this week’s webcast.

Managing Wildlife Using Today's Technology

Wildlife research techniques have come a long way over the years, and technology has made gathering data about wild animals more exact and much easier. Everything from airplanes down to tiny transmitters like this one on a grasshopper sparrow allow us to track animal movements, mortality and other information that once was almost impossible to collect. Learn more about some of the technology used in wildlife research in this week's webcast with wildlife division chief Casey Anderson.